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Adobe Marks 25 Years of Premiere

Adobe Marks 25 Years of Premiere

Adobe is celebrating a quarter century of its editing software Premiere this year, and to mark the occasion, the company is launching “Make the Cut,” a global editing competition in partnership with rock band Imagine Dragons.

“From YouTube to Hollywood, TV to the Sundance Film Festival, Premiere Pro has transformed the way we create film and video. See where Premiere started and how it’s evolved through the years,” Adobe said in a statement. “From aspiring creators to broadcast and film professionals, Premiere Pro has helped editors deliver stunning video content, adapting over the years with significant features and changes driven by the needs of users.”

The competition will give fans access to uncut footage from the official music video of the band’s song “Believer,” and asks contestants to cut an original version of the video using Premiere Pro. The projects will be judged by the band, Matt Eastin, the director and editor of the original video, Oscar-winning editor Angus Wall, and award-winning music video editor Vinnie Hobbs.

Along with a grand prize of $25,000, Adobe is also offering bonus prizes of $1,000 each, along with a year-long Creative Cloud subscription for four other winners (Best Young Creator, Best Short Form, Fan Favorite and Most Unexpected). Adobe will also award $2,500, a year of Creative Cloud, and 25 Adobe Stock credits to the music video that best used Adobe Stock clips.

First released in late 1991, Adobe Premiere bucked traditional video editing system trends, with no hardware attached, making it the first software-only video editing offering.

“A history of innovation has made Premiere Pro an industry leader, and the preferred choice for major filmmakers like David Fincher, Joel and Ethan Coen, Tim Miller, David Lowery and indie filmmakers like Kyle Patrick Alvarez, Jack Price and Jennifer Phang but also of the next generation, YouTubers like RocketJump, Karen Kavett, Ryan Connolly, Devin Graham (aka Supertramp) and Gunnarolla, and new creatives like Sarah Diestchy and Kayla Briet,” Bill Roberts, senior director of video product management for Adobe, wrote in a blog post.

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